International

Ndebele

Ndebele, also called Transvaal Ndebele, any of several Bantu-speaking African peoples who live primarily in the Limpopo and Mpumalanga provinces in South Africa. The Ndebele are ancient offshoots of the main Nguni-speaking peoples and began migrations to the Transvaal region in the 17th century.

The main group of Transvaal Ndebele traces its ancestry to Musi, or Msi, who, with his followers, diverged from a small group of Nguni people migrating down the southeastern coast of Africa and eventually settled in the Transvaal at the site of modern Pretoria. The descendants of Musi’s people were joined in the 18th and 19th centuries by Nguni people fleeing from the wars of Dingiswayo and Shaka in Natal. The Transvaal Ndebele survived the Zulu raids by hiding in the bush. As a result, however, they were geographically divided into separate groups.

Ndebele women wear traditional handmade ornaments signifying marital status

Like most Nguni peoples, all the Transvaal Ndebele groups resided in hamlets and relied on animal husbandry and the cultivation of corn (maize), millet, beans, sweet potatoes, and various other crops. Polygyny was permitted, and descent, succession, and inheritance followed the male line.

The Ndebele women continue their tradition of creating elaborate beadwork of all sorts and of painting the walls of their homes (both interior and exterior) with strong, brightly colored geometric designs. Although the modern Ndebele have retained many of their unique customs, urbanization has affected their traditional cultural patterns. Many Ndebele men are now employed in towns or mines, and many others are forced to leave their families for extended periods in search of work.

In 1979 many of the Transvaal Ndebele were resettled in KwaNdebele, a Bantustan (homeland) which became part of Eastern Transvaal (now Mpumalanga) province in 1994. Other Transvaal Ndebele were included in the Bantustan of Lebowa (now in Limpopo province).

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